US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District Website

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Tag: Las Conchas Fire
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  • November

    District Hosts Regional Water Manager Community of Practice Meeting

    The Albuquerque District hosted the 2014 South Pacific Division Hydrology & Hydraulics and Reservoir Control Community of Practice meeting Oct. 28-30.
  • August

    Corps’ Rain Gauges Contribute to Safe Monsoon Season

    Last year, the Corps’ Albuquerque District purchased and installed rain gauges to act as an early warning system in canyons heavily burned by the Las Conchas Fire, which, at the time, was the biggest fire in New Mexico history and torched upwards of 150,000 acres.
  • June

    Cochiti Lake Project Welcomes International Visitors

    For the third year, employees in the Corps’ Cochiti Lake project welcomed visitors with the Council on International Relations (CIR) and discussed Cochiti Dam history and operations. This year, the group also learned about the aftermath of the Las Conchas Fire and the Corps’ tribal relations and partnerships.
  • April

    Log Boom Necessary to Help Sequester Debris at Cochiti Lake

    The District has generated outreach materials and has updated its website to remind boaters and kayakers visiting Cochiti Lake that a log boom is in place.
  • December

    Log Boom to Help Clear Lake of Debris

    In response to the large amount of debris that was flowing into the Corps’ Cochiti Lake from the aftermath of the Las Conchas Fire, the District decided to install 50, 20-foot-long log booms on Nov. 17 to help collect future debris.
  • October

    Corps, Santa Clara Pueblo Sign Historic Agreement

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District and the Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico signed a historic partnership agreement Sept. 21 to conduct a watershed assessment for the Pueblo’s lands in the aftermath of June’s devastating Las Conchas forest fire.
  • August

    Fish and Fire in the Rio Grande

    You just don’t expect fish to drown, and it is almost counter intuitive that dead fish down in the valley could somehow be the result of a fire high up in the mountains.
  • New Mexico’s Worst Wildfire Contained by Collaboration

    The USDA Forest Service reported Aug. 1 that, after 36 long days, firefighters fully contained the Las Conchas Fire, the largest wildland fire in New Mexico’s recorded history.
  • July

    Firefighters Bed Down at Corps’ Campground

    As of July 11, the Las Conchas fire continues to burn and has scarred nearly 150,000 acres of Santa Fe National Forest in Sandoval, Los Alamos and Rio Arriba counties in northern New Mexico and has caused eight injuries.