US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

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Archive: August, 2012
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  • August

    Flood Fighting: District Assists Effort to Lower Bonito Lake

    The June 2012 Little Bear Fire burned 44,330 acres of private and Lincoln National Forest land in southern New Mexico, the majority in a wedge of prime timberland surrounding Bonito Creek. Beautiful, clear Bonito Lake, water supply for the City of Alamogordo and for Holloman Air Force Base, was overrun by the flames, which also burned 242 homes and 12 additional structures on the checkerboard lands adjacent to the lake.
  • What Can the Corps do? Wildfire Effects Mitigation Authorities Explained

    The Corps has some limited authority to address flood hazards within watersheds affected by wildfires. The Corps’ emergency assistance is intended, by law, to be temporary in order to meet immediate threats. It is not intended to provide permanent solutions to flooding problems. Categories of emergency assistance permitted under Public Law 84-99 include:
  • Corps’ Rain Gauges Contribute to Safe Monsoon Season

    Last year, the Corps’ Albuquerque District purchased and installed rain gauges to act as an early warning system in canyons heavily burned by the Las Conchas Fire, which, at the time, was the biggest fire in New Mexico history and torched upwards of 150,000 acres.
  • Step by Step — How the Corps Responds to Emergencies

    Public Law 84-99 dictates how the Corps will manage emergencies and provide flood-related technical assistance, as well as flood flight support to state and local governments.
  • West Ramp Areas of Base Protected From New Station

    Fire fighters at Holloman Air Force Base, six miles west of Alamogordo, N.M., are settling into a new crash and fire rescue station recently constructed through a contract between the Corps and Anthony & Gordon Construction Co, Inc.
  • Commission Hears from Those in District who Focus on Reducing Risks from Flooding

    The Emergency Manager for Sandoval County, N.M., Assistant Fire Chief David Bervin, approached the District to provide a presentation to the county’s Planning and Zoning Commission about Cochiti Dam.
  • Peer Supporters Stand Ready to Assist Employees

    For the past eight years, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been providing emotional first aid to employees through the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) program. CISM began in the Southwestern Division after employees started having adverse reactions following several instances of people drowning at local Corps’ projects.