US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

Cochiti Lake Project Welcomes International Visitors

Published June 1, 2012
On March 27, 2012, Cochiti Project employees hosted seven professional water managers    representing five counties in the Sahel Region of Africa.  Specifically, the water managers represented Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal.  The visitors and their    interpreter are shown with Supervisory Park Ranger Mark Rosacker (second from right).

On March 27, 2012, Cochiti Project employees hosted seven professional water managers representing five counties in the Sahel Region of Africa. Specifically, the water managers represented Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal. The visitors and their interpreter are shown with Supervisory Park Ranger Mark Rosacker (second from right).

For the third year, employees in the Corps’ Cochiti Lake project welcomed visitors with the Council on International Relations (CIR) and discussed Cochiti Dam history and operations.  This year, the group also learned about the aftermath of the Las Conchas Fire and the Corps’ tribal relations and partnerships.

“They were provided a program by Jacob Pecos at Cochiti Pueblo in the morning then toured Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument and visited the Cochiti Project in the afternoon,” Supervisor Park Ranger Mark Rosacker said.  Additionally, he said they obtained permission to bring the group to Cochiti Canyon to see Dixon’s Apple Farm, which sustained severe fire and flood damage.

The group’s coordinator said it is rare to get detailed feedback from the international visitors, but not this time.

One visitor said, “Santa Fe was like home – very few trees, very dry. We met with scientists who work on hydrology as well as green-house agriculture. I realized that here in the United States scientists share information. We saw a revolutionary new method for measuring stream flow. It was a very beneficial visit to Santa Fe and helped me understand that Americans are open to the outside world.”

Another visitor said, “Santa Fe reminded me of a village back home. What most impressed me is what is being done to fight drought as well as climate change, as well as the work being done by the Corps of Engineers to manage water and dams.”

Yet another said, “I was very moved by the discussion with the Pueblo leaders – their history, how they survived. They were very brave to come before us and talk about their problems. I didn’t think that in America you would have situations where the government does things without consulting the people. The home hospitality reminded me of being at home! I didn’t think you could have those types of gatherings in America, because everyone told us that Americans are only interested in themselves, not in groups. People were so kind and humble and treated us as equals. This erased another idea that I had about Americans.”