US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

Colorado Projects

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Synoptic Sampling

The Animas River is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partners with the Corps for this project are the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the U.S. the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Geology Survey (USGS). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The Animas River flows through Silverton, in San Juan County, Southwest Colorado. Metals loading from historic mining operations and natural geological processes have significantly impacted the Animas River. Previous characterization efforts have identified the sources of some metal loadings. Due to the size of the basin, an extensive reach northeast of Silverton, Colorado, has approximately 50% of the total metals loading unidentified. The project will attempt to quantify specific surface and groundwater loadings into the Animas River northeast of Silverton.

Project Description

Metals loading from historic mining operations and natural geological processes have significantly impacted the Animas River. Previous characterization efforts have identified the sources of some metal loadings. Due to the size of the basin, an extensive reach northeast of Silverton, Colorado, has approximately 50% of the total metals loading unidentified.

The project will attempt to quantify specific surface and groundwater loadings into the Animas River northeast of Silverton. The project will include surface water monitoring, development and monitoring of groundwater wells in alluvial deposits, tracer investigations to locate infiltration sources, geophysical investigations, and remedial feasibility analysis.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Colorado River watershed.

  • Determine which potential source areas are impacting basin-wide water quality by the release of mine-related contaminants to the environment and what the magnitude of the impact is on the environment through measurement of flow rates and collection of water quality samples.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

A memorandum of understanding between the USACE and USDAFS was prepared in April, 2002. Funds were transferred to the USFS in April to support this project. Once the report is available on the USGS web site, a link will be available at this web site. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

 

Spring Flush

The Animas River is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partners with the Corps for this project are the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the U.S. the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Geology Survey (USGS). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The Animas River flows through Silverton, in San Juan County, Southwest Colorado. The Animas River is mostly a high-gradient, snow-fed mountain stream that has been significantly adversely affected by metal contamination from both historic mining and natural geological process. Local residents have observed that during the incipient stages of the spring thaw, the stream turns dark for several days, apparently as it carries a flush of concentrated metals that achieve high saturation levels due to prolonged contact with acid-metals forming rock over the winter.

Project Description

In 2002, the USGS will collect surface water quality samples for laboratory analysis within this drainage basin. The Corps will provide funding for USGS to prepare a report of the analytical results, providing copies to the Corps and other stakeholders.

The purpose of this project is to locate, differentiate, and quantify significant loading sources to Stream Segment 3a. Sampling is proposed to characterize the incipient stages of the spring flush event.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Colorado River watershed.

  • Determine which potential source areas are impacting basin-wide water quality by the release of mine-related contaminants to the environment and what the magnitude of the impact is on the environment through measurement of flow rates and collection of water quality samples.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

The USGS has collected and analyzed the water quality samples, and the report is in preparation. Once the report is available on the USGS web site, a link will be available at this web site.

 

The Bonner Mine is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partners with the Corps for this project are the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The state partners with the Corps are Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG) and University of New Mexico (UNM).

An estimated 1000-1500 mining-related sites exist on federal and private land in the Upper Animas Basin, San Juan County, Colorado. Gold was discovered in Arrastra Gulch in 1875, and the Silverton Mining District was born. By 1880, the majority of mining camps were established throughout the basin. Mining activities continued on a widespread basis in the District until the late 1950's, and then on a small scale until the 1980's. In 1993, the last major producer of ore, Sunnyside Gold, closed its mining activities. Metals produced included zinc, gold, silver and lead.

The Bonner Mine is located in the Middle Fork of Mineral Creek in the Upper Animas River Basin. This mine was operated until the mid 1940's with the principal ore being zinc. The site is located on San Juan National Forest Lands, and the USFS is the lead agency for the mitigation of the contaminant release from the site.

Project Description

Mining activities began in the Upper Animas Basin around the 1880's. The Bonner Mine was operated until the mid 1940's, the principal ore being zinc. Waste rock piles from adit tunneling are present on steep, mountain slopes. Drainage from the waste rock/adits may be contributing to contaminant loading in the Middle Fork of Mineral Creek. The USFS is working with the UNMCE to determine a method of slope stabilization and reduce the stream loading. The USACE supported UNMCE with the installation of a weather station at the mine site. The weather station is also measuring soil pressure potential, soil moisture contents, and soil temperatures. The data obtained will be used for numerical modeling characterization of the waste pile hydrology and to analyze methods of waste pile drainage.

Project Goals

The goal of this project is to work with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the University of New Mexico Civil Engineering Department (UNMCE) to develop a method of stabilizing and draining the waste dumps that are situated on potentially critical slopes.

Current Status

USACE field work for this project began in the spring of 2003 with sample collection for instrument calibration. The weather station was installed at the site on October 10 and 11, 2002 by Albuquerque and Omaha District personnel. Data acquisition will continue for at least one or two years.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Additional information regarding the project is available at the Bonner Mine Slope Stabilization Project website.

Ironton Park/Calhoon Property is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Ironton Park is located south of Ouray, in Ouray County, Colorado. The project site is under consideration for acquisition for the USFS Grand Mesa, Uncompaghre, and Gunnison (GMUG) National Forest. The site is located within the Red Mountain Historic Mining District in a setting of steep mountain slopes, precipitous peaks, and "U-shaped" glacially carved valley floors. Most ore deposits are located in the mineral belt associated with the San Juan volcanic field and the Silverton Caldera complex. Ironton Flats separates the Red Mountain Historic Mining District from the Ouray Historic Mining District.

The Red Mountain Historic Mining District is located in the center of a structural basin that is termed the "Red Mountain Sage". This basin is bounded on the north by Ironton Park, on the south by Red Mountain Pass, on the west by Red Mountain and North Mineral Creeks, and on the east by the lower slopes of Red Mounts No. 2 and 3. Most of the mines in the district are located within or adjacent to the Silverton Caldera, and ore was produced mainly from the Henson and Burns Formations. Localized quartz latite prophyritic intrusions were emplaced within the two formations. Both these formations and the San Juan Formation are composed primarily of rhyodacitic flows, breccias, and tuffs. The San Juan Formation also contains the Gilpin Peak quartz latite tuff.

Lead, iron, and zinc sulfides and sulfates, silver sulfosalts, and sulfobismuthates were concentrated within the faults and fracture zones of this district. Rich veins containing these minerals were mined on the northwest side of the caldera. Typically, iron-bearing minerals such as marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, pentalandite, cobaltite, enargite, tetrahedrite, and arsenopyrite are more abundant in Red Mountain mining district than in surrounding districts. Some of these minerals are more reactive to chemical, physical, and biological weathering than other base metal sulfides.

Project Description

In 2002, the Corps prepared a Site Specific Addenda to the General RAMS Work Plans for the collection of surface water quality, waste rock, and sediment samples from the project site for laboratory analyses. Project sampling locations were identified by the USFS. In addition, flow rate and channel cross-section area measurements were obtained in order to calculate discharge rates at all sample locations.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Uncompaghgre watershed.

  • Determine the effects of the local tailings and waste rock piles on the surface water quality of the drainage.

  • Determine the discharge rates to assist with calculations of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the drainages.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

Field work was performed by Corps and USFS personnel the week of August 19th, 2002. The Draft Data Summary and Quality Control Summary Reports were available for review and comment in December 2002. The Final Data Summary and Quality Control Summary Reports were completed in January 2003.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. The General RAMS Work Plan and General Site Safety and Health Plan are referenced in project work plans. These documents may be accessed from menu to the left. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Documents

1. Ironton Park / Calhoon Project Final Report

2. Site Specific Addendum

3. Site Safety and Health Plan

4. Chemical Data Quality Assessment Report

 

 

The North Fork of Clear Creek is located within the boundaries of the Omaha District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The North Fork of Clear Creek is within Gilpin County in north-central Colorado, in the Clear Creek Superfund study area. Characterization activities have focused on mine drainages. The numerous waste rock and mill tailing piles contain highly acid forming materials and contain high levels of leachable zinc, copper, manganese, and iron. It is estimated that 2,000 mine waste piles are located within the area. It is anticipated that characterization of the area will require several years to complete.

Project Description

In 2002, the Corps will prepare draft and final work plans for the collection of composite samples of waste rock from up to 40 waste rock piles located primarily in Chase Gulch of the North Fork of Clear Creek. Laboratory analyses will be performed on waste rock and meteoric water leachates from the composite samples. In addition, field log sheets will be prepared to document physical characteristics of each of the waste rock piles. The Corps will prepare draft and final reports to document field investigation activities performed, laboratory analytical results, data quality, and physical characteristics of the waste rock piles. The draft report will be reviewed by US BLM and Colorado DMG, responses to comments from BLM and Colorado DMG will be provided, and a final report will be issued.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the South Platte watershed.

  • Determine the effects of the local waste rock piles on the surface water quality of the South Platte River.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

In 2002, the draft work plan was submitted to US BLM and Colorado DMG for review and comment. Based on the comments received, a final work plan was prepared. Field work is currently planned to begin on September 9, 2002, and will be performed by Corps personnel from both Omaha and Albuquerque Districts, in conjunction with US BLM and Colorado DMG. The draft report is anticipated to be available not later than mid-November 2002 and will be available at this web site.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. The General RAMS Work Plan and General Site Safety and Health Plan are referenced in project work plans. These documents may be accessed from menu to the left

Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above.

Documents

1. North Fork of Clear Creek Final Report

2. Site Specific Addendum

3. Site Safety and Health Plan

 

 

The Sherman is located within the boundaries of the Albuquerque District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The Sherman Mine site is located in central Colorado a few miles southeast of Leadville in Lake County. The BLM is the federal land tenant at the site. The site contains dilapidated facility buildings, which are being considered for demolition and removal. A large waste rock pile has been deposited on the site and is disrupting local surface water runoff patterns. The surface water runoff flows across the waste rock pile, forming fragmented gullies and eroding the pile.

Project Description

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is the federal agency responsible for the site. The site contains dilapidated facility buildings that are being considered for demolition and removal. A large waste rock pile has been deposited on the site and is disrupting local surface water runoff patterns. The surface water runoff flows across the waste rock pile, forming fragmented gullies and eroding the pile. The waste rock is composed primarily of dolomite and limestone material. The pile is a source of carbonate material that may be used in local areas to help neutralize acidic runoff. The USACE will prepare an engineering design for a staged, waste rock material removal to both rid the stream of the existing waste rock and sediment plug and utilize the waste rock as a local resource where it might serve to neutralize acid generated at any of a number of sites.

Project Goals

The project goal is to develop a design to accommodate phased excavation of the waste rock and reconstructing a natural headwaters channel in steep terrain of the Mosquito Range.

Current Status

The USACE performed a site survey of the waste rock pile and associated structures in June of 2002. The existing surface of the site has been generated. The phased grading and drainage plan has been completed.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

The Sherman Mine Design is being converted to pdf and will be posted as soon as available.

The North Fork of Clear Creek is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Geology Survey (USGS). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The Snake River is located within Summit County in north-central Colorado within the Colorado River watershed.

Project Description

In 2001, the USGS collected surface water quality samples within this drainage basin for laboratory analysis . The USGS utilized the RAMS funds to prepare a report of the analytical results.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Snake River watershed.

  • Determine which potential source areas are impacting basin-wide water quality by the release of mine-related contaminants to the environment and what the magnitude of the impact is on the environment through measurement of flow rates and collection of water quality samples.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

The USGS has collected and analyzed the water quality samples, and the report Water and Sediment Study of the Snake River Watershed, Colorado, Oct. 9-12, 2001 is now available.

South Mosquito Creek and Buckskin Creek are located within the boundaries of the Omaha District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The state partner is the Colorado Department of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

These drainages are located in Park County approximately 4 miles west of Alma, Colorado, and are tributaries of Mosquito Creek and join the South Platte River near Alma. The London Mine is the only major mine along Mosquito Creek. Drainage from the London Extension Tunnel, from the Water Tunnel, the London Extension mine waste pile, the Water Tunnel mine waste pile, the Butte mill tailings pile, the Butte mine waste pile, the American Shaft waste pile, other historic tailings piles, and a recent tailings embankment are believed to be impacting water quality in the drainage. In addition, historic mining activities within the Buckskin Creek area may also be impacting water quality within that drainage. Mine features in each drainage would be bracketed during low-flow to determine heavy metals loading originating from each potential source area.

Project Description

In 2002, the Corps prepared draft and final work plans for the collection of surface water quality samples from South Mosquito and Buckskin Creeks for laboratory analyses. In addition, flow rate and channel cross-section area measurements were obtained in order to calculate discharge rates at all sample locations. The Corps prepared draft and final reports to document field investigation activities performed, laboratory analytical results, data quality, and discharge rates. The draft report was reviewed by USFS and Colorado DMG, responses to comments from BLM and Colorado DMG were provided, and a final report was issued.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Upper South Platte River watershed.

  • Determine the effects of the local tailings piles on the surface water quality of the drainage.

  • Determine the discharge rates to assist with calculations of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the drainages.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

Field work was performed by Corps and USFS personnel the week of August 19th, 2002. The draft report was available in January 2003 for review and comment. No comments were received, and the report was finalized.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. The General RAMS Work Plan and General Site Safety and Health Plan are referenced in project work plans. These documents may be accessed from menu to the left. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Documents

1. South Mosquito Creek and Buckskin Creek Draft Report

2. South Mosquito Creek and Buckskin Creek Site Specific Addendum

3. South Mosquito Creek and Buckskin Creek Site Safety and Health Plan

 South Mosquito Creek and Buckskin Creek Map

 

The Eleven Mile Reach of the Upper Arkansas River is located within the boundaries of the Albuquerque District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partners with the Corps for this project are the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

Approximately 11 miles of the Upper Arkansas River south of Leadville, Colorado, contain deposits of tailings generated during historic mining operations in the Leadville Mining District. The district lies at an elevation of about 10,000 feet. The tailings contain elevated concentrations of metal sulfides, which weather to produce surface and groundwater with low pH and high dissolved metals concentrations. This degrades groundwater and surface water quality and inhibits plant growth. The US EPA has attempted remediation in the area by soil neutralization, nutrification with sewer sludge, and seeding with native grasses. A network of groundwater wells were established and are periodically monitored. The remediation has been successful in some of the amended areas though not in others. The groundwater quality and soil quality improvements below the amended areas have not been achieved. The USGS has existing lysimeters and piezometers installed in the area to collect soil moisture and shallow groundwater samples in order to monitor the vadose zone in some areas under remediation.

Project Description

In 2002, the USGS received a grant from the US EPA to continue monitoring in the area. The Corps, in cooperation with USGS, prepared work plans for the purpose of installing additional lysimeters and/or piezometers as well as sampling existing and newly installed lysimeters and piezometers. Corps personnel performed the field work in conjunction with USGS personnel in October 2003. The report will be prepared by the USGS.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Arkansas River watershed.

  • Determine the effects of the local tailings piles on the aquatic and biological quality of the Arkansas River.

  • Determine the effects of potential remediation methods for neutralizing tailings piles.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

The draft work plan was submitted to the US EPA and the State of Colorado in late August 2002 for review. No comments were received from any stakeholders, and the draft work plan was utilized as the Final Work Plan. Field work was conducted by USGS and Corps personnel in October 2002, and a link to the report will be provided when it becomes available.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Documents

1. Draft Sampling and Analysis Plan

 

The Upper Slate River is located within the boundaries of the Sacramento District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). The state partner is the Colorado Department of Minerals and Geology (DMG).

The Upper Slate River located near Crested Butte in Northern Gunnison County, Colorado. Excessive concentrations of iron and manganese have been identified in surface waters, indicating weathering of pyritic materials and acid rock drainage formation. The sources of the metals are suspected to be waste rock and tails from silver and gold mining and milling processes in the region.

Project Description

In 2002, the Corps prepared draft and final work plans for the collection of surface water quality samples from the Upper Slate River and its tributaries for laboratory analyses. In addition, flow rate and channel cross-section area measurements were obtained in order to calculate discharge rates at all sample locations. The draft work plan was reviewed by the USFS and Colorado DMG. The Corps prepared draft and final reports to document field investigation activities performed, laboratory analytical results, data quality, and discharge rates. The draft report was reviewed by USFS and Colorado DMG, responses to comments from BLM and Colorado DMG were provided, and a final report was issued.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Upper Slate River watershed.

  • Determine the effects of the local tailings and waste rock piles on the surface water quality of the drainage.

  • Determine the discharge rates to assist with calculations of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for the drainages.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

The draft work plan was reviewed by USFS and Colorado DMG, and a final work plan was prepared to respond to review comments. Field work was performed by Corps and USFS personnel the week of August 5th, 2002. The draft report was provided to stakeholders in January 2003 for review and comment. A final report was completed in August 2003.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. The General RAMS Work Plan and General Site Safety and Health Plan are referenced in project work plans. These documents may be accessed from menu to the left. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Documents

1. Upper Slate River Final Report

2. Site Specific Addendum    

3. Site Safety and Health Plan

 

The Willow Creek is located within the boundaries of the Albuquerque District of the Corps of Engineers. The federal partner with the Corps for this project is the U.S. Forest Service). The state partner is the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology (DMG), and the local partner is the Willow Creek Reclamation Committee.

Willow Creek is a tributary to the Rio Grande, which flows through the town of Creede, Mineral County, in southwestern Colorado. The creek forms a confluence with the Rio Grande approximately 1.75 miles south of Creede.

Project Description

Tailings from silver mines of the Creede silver mining district are located in a large heap in the alluvial valley of Willow Creek, downstream from the town. It is suspected that the tailings provide contaminants to a groundwater plume that may enter and degrade the water quality of the Rio Grande. The USACE is assisting the Willow Creek Reclamation Committee by installing monitoring wells down-gradient of the tailings pile. Groundwater sampling of the wells will help confirm plume delineation determined by geophysical surveys.

Project Goals

The project goals have been established based on a watershed approach. The following goals have been identified:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Rio Grande River watershed.

  • Determine which potential source areas are impacting basin-wide water quality by the release of mine-related contaminants to the environment and what the magnitude of the impact is on the environment through measurement of flow rates and collection of water quality samples.

  • Help populate the RAMS database with results from the studies.

Current Status

The USACE Omaha District Corps Drill Unit and a geologist from the USACE Albuquerque District worked with the local property owner and a representative from the Willow Creek Reclamation Committee to advance boreholes and complete monitoring wells during the week of October 21, 2002. Five monitoring wells were completed from depths of 18 to 23 ft. below the ground surface. One soil boring was advanced through the tailings pile and abandoned with a bentonite seal. Soil and tailings samples were submitted to the laboratory analyses. The wells were sampled the week of November 18, 2002. The Draft Report was available in April 2003. The Final Report was issued in June 2003.

Existing Documents

As documents for this project become available, they will be provided in PDF format that can be accessed by clicking on the title of the document below. The General RAMS Work Plan and General Site Safety and Health Plan are referenced in project work plans. These documents may be accessed from menu to the left. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these documents and may be downloaded free of charge from the Adobe Acrobat web site by clicking on Adobe Acrobat Reader above. Disclaimer: The appearance of an external hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of this web site or the information, products, or services contained therein. USACE does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at this location.

Documents

1. Willow Creek Final Draft

2. Site Specific Addendum