US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

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Tag: Clean Water Act
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  • February

    Albuquerque District, Regulatory Division, Approved Jurisdictional Determination for Little Rock Mine

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Regulatory Program, routinely conducts determinations of geographic jurisdiction under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Section 404 geographic jurisdiction is referred to as “waters of the U.S.”
  • September

    Regulatory Division: Protecting the Waters of the United States

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Regulatory Division has the authority to protect the Waters of the United States. As part of this authority, anyone, or any entity, who wishes to put anything into U.S. waters that might introduce material into the river, needs to obtain a Section 404 Permit from the Corps.
  • December

    District Regulator Receives Two Awards for Water Work

    Marcy Leavitt, Texas/New Mexico Branch Chief of the Albuquerque District’s Regulatory Division, recently received two honors recognizing her work that has helped protect not just water quality, but also watersheds and headwaters – precious resources in an arid state.
  • Regulator Works on Cultural Resource Solution

    As part of evaluating projects under the Clean Water Act, regulatory employees are charged with enforcing permit conditions related to requirements stipulated in the National Historic Preservation Act and other applicable federal laws pertaining to the protection of natural and cultural resources. Such was the case when a District regulator responded to a permit application in 2005 from Ute Lake Ranch, Inc. (ULRI), a private company proposing to build a housing development on the southeast side of Ute Lake in Quay County, N.M. (north of Tucumcari).
  • September

    Quick to Provide Regulatory Assistance!

    The largest wildfire in New Mexico’s history burned through predominantly inaccessible wilderness from May to July in southern New Mexico’s Gila National Forest, leaving extensive environmental damage that will affect several small, remote communities for years. It was dubbed the “Whitewater-Baldy” Fire.
  • February

    Corps Helps Creek Regain Its Curves

    Approximately 50 years ago, a creek blew out during a storm on a Colorado man’s property in the San Luis Valley, just south of Poncha Pass, and started to realign itself. At the time, the landowner saw an opportunity to straighten about a mile of the creek, and he intervened. However, in a few years, the creek turned into a ditch and remained that way until recently.
  • August

    Post Fire, Corps Helps Town Protect Water Supply

    The people in the town of Raton, N.M., know that a wildfire’s effects don’t end when the last smoldering ember is extinguished. The “Track Fire” originated June 12 on the northern outskirts of Raton and quickly got out of control. It eventually burned almost 27,800 acres, thousands of trees and much of the ground-cover vegetation of the watershed around Lake Maloya in Sugarite Canyon, which straddles the New Mexico-Colorado border.