US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

Silvery Minnow Increase

Public Affairs
Published Aug. 27, 2015
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Silvery minnow are measured before being released back into the Rio Grande, Aug. 25, 2015.  District biologists are monitoring habitat restoration sites to learn more about the endangered silvery minnow population.  This minnow is over 3 inches, which indicates it is over a year old. Minnows produced this year average 30-35 millimeters or about 1.5 inches in length.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Silvery minnow are measured before being released back into the Rio Grande, Aug. 25, 2015. District biologists are monitoring habitat restoration sites to learn more about the endangered silvery minnow population. This minnow is over 3 inches, which indicates it is over a year old. Minnows produced this year average 30-35 millimeters or about 1.5 inches in length.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Silvery minnow are measured before being released back into the Rio Grande, Aug. 25, 2015.  District biologists are monitoring habitat restoration sites to learn more about the endangered silvery minnow population.  This minnow is over 3 inches, which indicates it is over a year old. Minnows produced this year average 30-35 millimeters or about 1.5 inches in length.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Silvery minnow are measured before being released back into the Rio Grande, Aug. 25, 2015. District biologists are monitoring habitat restoration sites to learn more about the endangered silvery minnow population. This minnow is over 3 inches, which indicates it is over a year old. Minnows produced this year average 30-35 millimeters or about 1.5 inches in length.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – District biologists continue to monitor habitat restoration sites to learn more about the endangered silvery minnow population. Based on previous studies, the minnows are using these sites.

The biologists report seeing an increase in the number of minnows they are finding this year, with more than 135 counted Aug. 25, at two sites. Minnows are counted, measured and then released back into the Rio Grande.

“Observations are that the silvery minnow is doing better this year,” said fishery biologist Michael Porter.

Most of the silvery minnow were juvenile minnows, produced this year due to the continuing rains in May and June which brought the water levels up, especially on the Rio Grande’s floodplains where the habitat restoration sites are located.

One of the biggest finds during recent field work were two silvery minnows measuring over 3 inches in length. According to Porter, this indicates they are older minnows, possibly 2-5 years old. Minnows produced this year average 30-35 millimeters or about 1.5 inches in length.