US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

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  • September

    Tour for Congress Staffers Strengthens Partnerships

    The District had the unique opportunity of collaborating with other federal and state water management agencies to provide a thorough field briefing to New Mexico’s congressional staff members during the week of Aug. 8.
  • August

    Post Fire, Corps Helps Town Protect Water Supply

    The people in the town of Raton, N.M., know that a wildfire’s effects don’t end when the last smoldering ember is extinguished. The “Track Fire” originated June 12 on the northern outskirts of Raton and quickly got out of control. It eventually burned almost 27,800 acres, thousands of trees and much of the ground-cover vegetation of the watershed around Lake Maloya in Sugarite Canyon, which straddles the New Mexico-Colorado border.
  • June

    Corps Program Recruits Minnows

    Endangered animals frequently survive in natural habitats that have been grossly altered or have largely disappeared due to human or natural causes. In the case of the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow, water development projects and practices on the Rio Grande and the Pecos River have contributed to the elimination of this fish from most of its original range.
  • May

    New Turbine Increases Hydroelectric Power

    Despite a rough beginning more than two decades ago, the Abiquiu hydroelectric facility’s third turbine officially turned on when Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) pushed the start button at a ceremony at the facility April 21.
  • March

    District Hosts Meeting to Discuss Rio Grande

    More than 80 Rio Grande stakeholders met at the District headquarters Feb. 18 to discuss urbanization issues and possible projects associated with the Rio Grande, referred to by some as the “spine of New Mexico.”
  • February

    Tribes Step Forward to Sponsor Work

    When the sponsor for the Española Basin project pulled its support for this flood risk management study in 1996, people assumed that the project was finished. But in 2004, an alliance of three Pueblos, Ohkay Owingeh, Santa Clara and San Ildefonso, devised a new, holistic vision for the project that made ecosystem restoration the centerpiece of river and flood management efforts.