US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

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Tag: water
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  • August

    Flood Fighting: District Assists Effort to Lower Bonito Lake

    The June 2012 Little Bear Fire burned 44,330 acres of private and Lincoln National Forest land in southern New Mexico, the majority in a wedge of prime timberland surrounding Bonito Creek. Beautiful, clear Bonito Lake, water supply for the City of Alamogordo and for Holloman Air Force Base, was overrun by the flames, which also burned 242 homes and 12 additional structures on the checkerboard lands adjacent to the lake.
  • Corps’ Rain Gauges Contribute to Safe Monsoon Season

    Last year, the Corps’ Albuquerque District purchased and installed rain gauges to act as an early warning system in canyons heavily burned by the Las Conchas Fire, which, at the time, was the biggest fire in New Mexico history and torched upwards of 150,000 acres.
  • May

    District Restores Ecosystems with River Engineering

    River engineering is the process of planned human intervention in the course or flow of a river with the intention of producing a benefit, like reduced flooding or easier passage. While involved in river engineering today, the Corps has increased the emphasis on protecting and restoring the environment.
  • Santa Rosa Students Ready for the Water

    Bob Mumford, a park ranger at the District’s Santa Rosa Dam, wrote and received a grant from ENMR, a local phone cooperative, to purchase and distribute lifejackets and Whistles for Life to all the students at the elementary school.
  • April

    Corps Addresses Water Resource Challenges with Assistance from Native American Tribes

    In Albuquerque District’s area of responsibility, Native American Tribes or Pueblos control 80 percent of the land in the middle Rio Grande Valley. For the Corps to be successful in addressing any water resource challenge in the valley, be it endangered species or drought, tribes must be intimately involved in developing potential solutions.
  • Colorado to be Next Focus of Rio Grande Basin Partnering Meeting

    The Corps shares concern with others about the Rio Grande Basin and its tributaries, as it faces multiple environmental problems like ecosystem degradation, competing demands for minimal resources, timing and delivery of water into and through the basin and water quality, as well as climate changes. To discuss solutions, the agency has joined representatives from federal, state, local and tribal entities across Texas, New Mexico and Colorado to review technical, professional and public concerns during ‘stakeholder’ meetings.
  • March

    New Dock to Enable Park Rangers to Respond on Lake Faster

    The District completed the installation of a fully enclosed service dock at Cochiti Lake March 2, allowing the project’s patrol boat to be on the water at all times. It is an improvement the park rangers believe will have significant public safety benefits.
  • Soaking a “Site” for Science

    Although many archaeological sites are located along lakeshores across the country, little is known about how changes in water levels affect these sites. Jonathan Van Hoose, one of the District’s archaeologists, set out to change that.
  • January

    Scrutinizing Sediment Deposits at Cochiti Lake

    The effectiveness of Cochiti Dam for sediment control has led to a serious issue confronting the reservoir—sediment deposition is reducing reservoir storage capacity and causing significant aggradation upstream within the Rio Grande channel. Monitoring sediment volume, spatial distribution and rate of deposition is of paramount concern to the District. Consequences for the operation and life expectancy of Cochiti Dam and Reservoir are at stake.
  • District Achieves another First for Tribal Program

    In the first meeting of its kind, Robert Isenberg and Maj. Seth Wacker, members of the South Pacific Division’s 59th Forward Engineering Support Team - Advanced (FEST) joined District Tribal Liaison Ron Kneebone in a visit with representatives of two New Mexico Pueblos Dec. 14 and 15. They met with the Pueblo of Santa Clara and the Pueblo de Cochiti to provide the Native American tribes with critically needed engineering support to address local infrastructure issues and to provide FEST members with real-world training.