US Army Corps of Engineers
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  • December

    Technology ‘Fingerprints’ Unexploded Ordnance

    In September, Albuquerque District Project Manager Trent Simpler and Geologist Mark Phaneuf joined a team from U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville, Ala., to collect bomb data at two Florida museums. Huntsville Center is capturing and cataloging what may best be described as the fingerprints of munitions items, such as bombs, mortars, artillery projectiles and fuzes, in an effort to improve how work is done at Formerly Used Defense Sites. The Center’s Environmental and Munitions Center of Expertise (EM CX) has begun to put together a library of ordnance signatures.
  • New Well at Cochiti to Provide Much-Needed Water

    On Sept. 27 the Cochiti Project’s pump for its water well went out. During the process to replace the 20 horsepower pump, the original well, drilled in 1964, collapsed. A whole new well had to be drilled to restore the water supply, said Cochiti Lake Project Manager Mark Rosacker. If everything goes according to plan, the new well is expected to be online shortly after Thanksgiving.
  • Division’s First OCA Held at Cochiti Dam

    The first Operation Condition Assessment (OCA) in the South Pacific Division (SPD) took place the week of Oct. 8 at the Corps’ Cochiti Dam project, located about 50 miles north of Albuquerque.
  • Regulator Works on Cultural Resource Solution

    As part of evaluating projects under the Clean Water Act, regulatory employees are charged with enforcing permit conditions related to requirements stipulated in the National Historic Preservation Act and other applicable federal laws pertaining to the protection of natural and cultural resources. Such was the case when a District regulator responded to a permit application in 2005 from Ute Lake Ranch, Inc. (ULRI), a private company proposing to build a housing development on the southeast side of Ute Lake in Quay County, N.M. (north of Tucumcari).
  • November

    Cochiti Dam Selected for Maintenance Management Review

    Jacobs Engineering, an independent contractor, was hired in 2011 to complete an assessment of the Corps’ Facility Equipment Maintenance (FEM) National Utilization Plan. According to best practices cited by Jacobs, an organization should be spending 4.8 percent of its budget on maintenance. Right now, the Corps spends about 0.2 percent. As a result of the assessment, Michael Ensch, chief of operations, Directorate of Civil Works, Headquarters, issued a national memorandum concerning the development of a maintenance management strategy. The memorandum detailed the creation of eight pilot studies, one for each of the Corps’ eight divisions, to be completed by November 2012.
  • Albuquerque Team “Reaches Back” to Afghanistan

    Besides continuing to send our employees to assist “in country,” Albuquerque District is now supporting operations in Afghanistan at home by providing design support for four Afghanistan National Army construction projects.
  • District Far Exceeds Small Business Goals in Fiscal Year 2012

    Fiscal Year 2012 was a banner year for the Albuquerque District, as the District exceeded its goals for contracts to small businesses in several categories.
  • District, ESCAFCA Sign Partnership Agreement

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albuquerque District and the Eastern Sandoval County Arroyo Flood Control Authority (ESCAFCA) signed an agreement Oct. 2 to partner on a geotechnical, hydrological, hydraulic, economic and environmental study of the existing spoil bank levees along the east side of the Rio Grande near the Town of Bernalillo, N.M.
  • Staff Conducts ‘Operation Turtle Eviction’ at Conchas Dam

    The Corps’ Conchas project will be busy with activity during the next few months, as maintenance work is performed on the stilling basin. It has been 40 years since the basin has been cleaned and inspected. However, before the de-watering takes place, rangers and maintenance personnel wanted to make a concerted effort to trap and relocate any amphibious residents living in the basin.
  • October

    District Cleans Up Weapons Disposal Site at Kirtland

    The Air Force identifies old or unneeded munitions and small arms that need disposed of at sites like the 165-acre Open Burn and Open Detonation site on Kirtland Air Force Base, created in the 1950s. In 2010, when the Air Force decided to close the site, initiating a mandatory cleanup required by regulation, they turned to the Corps.