US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District Website

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  • August

    Albuquerque District participates in riparian rehabilitation workshop at Cochiti Dam

    Biologists and natural resources managers with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque District, participated in a hands-on riparian construction workshop at the Corps of Engineers Cochiti Lake and Dam recently.
  • March

    District, Cochiti Elementary School Collaborate to Plant 125 Cottonwoods at Lake

    Cochiti project office staff and volunteers planted cottonwood and willow trees along the southern aspect of the Cochiti Recreation boat launch shoreline area, Feb. 17, 2017.
  • September

    Transforming the Desert into a Wetland

    Officials from the Corps and the city of Las Cruces participated in a grand-opening ceremony Sept. 5, 2014, by throwing out seed balls packed with a mixture of wildflower seeds that will sprout with the next rain.
  • December

    Corps, City of Las Cruces Partner on Environmental Restoration Project

    Officials from the Corps, the City of Las Cruces, N.M., and state legislative representatives participated in a groundbreaking ceremony Nov. 29 for a $1.5 million environmental restoration project near the Las Cruces Dam.
  • July

    Corps Checks Progress of Ecosystem Restoration

    The Corps has been actively involved in restoring the ecosystem of the Middle Rio Grande since 2007, when the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District initiated projects incorporating ecosystem revitalization along Route 66.
  • May

    District Restores Ecosystems with River Engineering

    River engineering is the process of planned human intervention in the course or flow of a river with the intention of producing a benefit, like reduced flooding or easier passage. While involved in river engineering today, the Corps has increased the emphasis on protecting and restoring the environment.
  • February

    District Takes Environmental Project Management to Next Level

    Taking the environmental investigations and remediation work from about $20 million in fiscal year 2010 to $54 million in fiscal year 2011 was no miracle. It was customer responsiveness, plain and simple.
  • Tracking Progress after Raton’s Tenacious Track Fire

    The last remnants of the wildfires were extinguished months ago, but hard-hit communities in the District are still cleaning up and repairing damages from the fires last summer. One such community is Raton, N.M.
  • January

    Cleaning up Cochiti

    While old transformers, antifreeze and aerosol cans aren’t significant archeological findings at the District’s Cochiti field project, they do signal that an environmental clean-up could be necessary.