US Army Corps of Engineers
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Tag: wildfire
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  • September

    Quick to Provide Regulatory Assistance!

    The largest wildfire in New Mexico’s history burned through predominantly inaccessible wilderness from May to July in southern New Mexico’s Gila National Forest, leaving extensive environmental damage that will affect several small, remote communities for years. It was dubbed the “Whitewater-Baldy” Fire.
  • April

    Log Boom Necessary to Help Sequester Debris at Cochiti Lake

    The District has generated outreach materials and has updated its website to remind boaters and kayakers visiting Cochiti Lake that a log boom is in place.
  • February

    Tracking Progress after Raton’s Tenacious Track Fire

    The last remnants of the wildfires were extinguished months ago, but hard-hit communities in the District are still cleaning up and repairing damages from the fires last summer. One such community is Raton, N.M.
  • August

    Post Fire, Corps Helps Town Protect Water Supply

    The people in the town of Raton, N.M., know that a wildfire’s effects don’t end when the last smoldering ember is extinguished. The “Track Fire” originated June 12 on the northern outskirts of Raton and quickly got out of control. It eventually burned almost 27,800 acres, thousands of trees and much of the ground-cover vegetation of the watershed around Lake Maloya in Sugarite Canyon, which straddles the New Mexico-Colorado border.
  • Fish and Fire in the Rio Grande

    You just don’t expect fish to drown, and it is almost counter intuitive that dead fish down in the valley could somehow be the result of a fire high up in the mountains.
  • New Mexico’s Worst Wildfire Contained by Collaboration

    The USDA Forest Service reported Aug. 1 that, after 36 long days, firefighters fully contained the Las Conchas Fire, the largest wildland fire in New Mexico’s recorded history.
  • July

    Firefighters Bed Down at Corps’ Campground

    As of July 11, the Las Conchas fire continues to burn and has scarred nearly 150,000 acres of Santa Fe National Forest in Sandoval, Los Alamos and Rio Arriba counties in northern New Mexico and has caused eight injuries.