US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

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  • August

    Trekking Down the River: The Rio Grande Expedition

    In mid-June, an expeditionary team from Austin, Texas, set out to tell the story, “The Disappearing Rio Grande Expedition, 1900 Miles From Source to Sea.”
  • October

    District Hosts Bi-Annual Rio Grande Basin Meeting

    The Albuquerque District hosted the Rio Grande Basin meeting on September 17-18, to discuss the impacts of the devastating wildfires during the past two years in the upper basin, and the resulting prior and present flooding.
  • March

    Going Green: The Silvery Minnow, Drought and the Rio Grande

    As signs of spring begin to show in the bosque, environmentalists, biologists and others continue their efforts to understand river flow issues along the Middle Rio Grande. Of particular interest are endangered species in relation to water use and jurisdiction. Within the past three years, the drought has proven to be a constant challenge to create and maintain a balanced environment for the silvery minnow to continue to spawn. Due to the drought, the environment needed for natural spawning is not present.
  • January

    Scrutinizing Sediment Deposits at Cochiti Lake

    The effectiveness of Cochiti Dam for sediment control has led to a serious issue confronting the reservoir—sediment deposition is reducing reservoir storage capacity and causing significant aggradation upstream within the Rio Grande channel. Monitoring sediment volume, spatial distribution and rate of deposition is of paramount concern to the District. Consequences for the operation and life expectancy of Cochiti Dam and Reservoir are at stake.
  • March

    District Hosts Meeting to Discuss Rio Grande

    More than 80 Rio Grande stakeholders met at the District headquarters Feb. 18 to discuss urbanization issues and possible projects associated with the Rio Grande, referred to by some as the “spine of New Mexico.”
  • February

    Tribes Step Forward to Sponsor Work

    When the sponsor for the Española Basin project pulled its support for this flood risk management study in 1996, people assumed that the project was finished. But in 2004, an alliance of three Pueblos, Ohkay Owingeh, Santa Clara and San Ildefonso, devised a new, holistic vision for the project that made ecosystem restoration the centerpiece of river and flood management efforts.