US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District Website

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Author: Ariane Pinson
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  • April

    Pilot project helps USACE evaluate changing climate across Southwest

    During the next century, the Southwestern United States is anticipated to warm at a rate second only to Alaska, driving up evaporation rates, driving down soil moisture, and resulting in reduced stream flow, increased erosion/sedimentation, and increased wildfire severity and forest loss. With drought conditions anticipated to occur in 80 percent of the years between now and 2100, water is anticipated to be the defining issue of this century.
  • October

    Where There’s Water, There’s a Way: Engineering with Nature in the Arid West

    What if you could make something good happen, and do so cost-effectively, sustainably and on a grand scale? You’d leap at the chance, wouldn’t you? Engineering with Nature (EWN) can make this happen.
  • March

    Seining for ‘Silver’ in the Rio Grande

    How Rio Grande silvery minnows are counted is examined in this article as well as implications if it is not an accurate count.
  • September

    Counting Fish in a Fluid Environment

    On a hot, sultry, mid-August day, I’m standing thigh-deep in the slow, muddy Rio Grande watching U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Fishery Biologist Dr. Michael “Mick” Porter and Aquatic Ecologist Justin Reale; Eric Gonzalez, Michael Hatch, Matt McMillan, biologists with SWCA Environmental Consultants; and TetraTech biologist Michael Marcus seine for fish.
  • A Community Perspective on the Corps’ Acequia Rehabilitation Program

    In recent years, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has used its authority under the Acequia Rehabilitation Program of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to work with the communities, the State of New Mexico and other federal agencies to upgrade many acequias, including downstream of Santa Rosa, N.M., on the Pecos River.
  • August

    Flood Fighting: District Assists Effort to Lower Bonito Lake

    The June 2012 Little Bear Fire burned 44,330 acres of private and Lincoln National Forest land in southern New Mexico, the majority in a wedge of prime timberland surrounding Bonito Creek. Beautiful, clear Bonito Lake, water supply for the City of Alamogordo and for Holloman Air Force Base, was overrun by the flames, which also burned 242 homes and 12 additional structures on the checkerboard lands adjacent to the lake.
  • July

    Archaeology in the Land of the Dead

    Jornada del Muerto – Journey of the Dead - for more than two centuries, Spanish colonists traveling between Mexico City and the Spanish colonial outpost at Santa Fe had to cross this desolate, waterless valley in south-central New Mexico.
  • March

    Soaking a “Site” for Science

    Although many archaeological sites are located along lakeshores across the country, little is known about how changes in water levels affect these sites. Jonathan Van Hoose, one of the District’s archaeologists, set out to change that.
  • August

    Fish and Fire in the Rio Grande

    You just don’t expect fish to drown, and it is almost counter intuitive that dead fish down in the valley could somehow be the result of a fire high up in the mountains.
  • June

    Corps Program Recruits Minnows

    Endangered animals frequently survive in natural habitats that have been grossly altered or have largely disappeared due to human or natural causes. In the case of the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow, water development projects and practices on the Rio Grande and the Pecos River have contributed to the elimination of this fish from most of its original range.