US Army Corps of Engineers
Albuquerque District

District Engages in Emergency Roof Repairs at Kirtland

Albuquerque District Public Affairs
Published March 15, 2012
KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M., -- One of the roofs damagaged by strong winds in December 2011.

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M., -- One of the roofs damagaged by strong winds in December 2011.

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M., -- Strong winds in early December 2011 caused damage to the roofs of several buildings.

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M., -- Strong winds in early December 2011 caused damage to the roofs of several buildings.

In early December 2011, a significant wind event damaged the roofs of several buildings on Kirtland Air Force Base. The winds were estimated greater than 50 mph along the flightline.

The base contacted the District in late December seeking assistance in getting contracts awarded to repair the roofs. According to Connie Runyan, project manager, the base turned to the District because they felt the Corps would be the fastest way to handle the contracts.

The District was able to address all but one of the contracts, in-house, through the District’s Contracting Division, using the simplified acquisition strategy.

Contract Specialist Joseph Rael said this strategy is used for all projects below $150,000 and is designed to reduce administrative costs, improve opportunities for underrepresented small businesses, promote efficiency and economy in contracting and avoid unnecessary burdens for agencies and contractors.

However, the damage to a large hangar near the flightline was more serious and required a large contract.

“The easiest way to get this awarded was to bring in the Corps’ Omaha District, which has a special emergency roof repair contract for use for disaster response,” Runyan said.

The repair work on the large hanger is expected to take 120 days, in two phases, which will allow the users of the hanger to continue their mission in half of the structure.

The first phase of the project, which involves an assessment of the damage and an explanation of what will be required to repair the roof, was awarded Jan. 30 to Bristol, a Native Alaskan firm.

The second phase will be negotiated in early March, after the Omaha District receives the contractor’s proposal.

“The base covered the hole in the large hanger using a water ballasting system to hold the temporary cover in place,” Runyan said. “However, despite being covered, base personnel cannot work on the damaged side of the hangar for safety reasons.”